Choosing a Rescue Dog

Dogs can bring so much joy into our lives, and there's no better way to experience that than bringing a companion dog into your home. While there are many ways to acquire a companion, one of the most rewarding ways is to adopt from your local shelter or rescue. When considering any dog, the decision should never be made on impulse. Keep in mind your dog has the potential to live eighteen (18) years, and can cost between $800-$1200 or more per year with veterinary care, food and other expenses. Our companions are like our children - they bring us joy but they also require effort and care.

Dogs can bring so much joy into our lives, and there's no better way to experience that than bringing a companion dog into your home. While there are many ways to acquire a companion, one of the most rewarding ways is to adopt from your local shelter or rescue. When considering any dog, the decision should never be made on impulse. Keep in mind your dog has the potential to live eighteen (18) years, and can cost between $800-$1200 or more per year with veterinary care, food and other expenses. Our companions are like our children - they bring us joy but they also require effort and care.

Everyone who walks into our facility is asked about what qualities they might be looking for in their ideal dog. Most reply that they are looking for a certain breed, likely one they have experienced before. Breed is important as each has their tendencies, but most shelter dogs are mixed with no way of knowing definitely what combinations might be present. Therefore, it is important to know what temperament would be compatible with family lifestyles.

Matchmaking mistakes are common and are the most likely reason owners experience behavioral issues causing dogs to end up in shelters in the first place.

  • How much space do you have designated for a dog?

  • How much energy does your family have as a whole?

  • What types of activities does your family typically engage in?

  • How many hours are you working per day/week?

  • What is your social life like, and does any part of it include the dog?

  • Do you have kids, and how old are they?

  • Do you have another dog at home; if so, what would he/she like in a companion?

Asking yourself these types of questions can better prepare you to choose the best match for your situation, which ultimately affects both how your dog behaves in your home and how you feel emotionally about your dog.

If your space is small and/or your energy and activity levels are low, consider a small breed or a dog with a really low energy level. If you work long hours, eight or more, consider a senior dog that doesn't require much exercise. If your family spends its summers hiking, you might be able to take on a younger, more energetic dog, but be prepared for mischief in the off season. If you spend most of your time traveling or you socialize in public areas where a dog may not be allowed, consider a less demanding dog.


Remember to teach your children appropriate ways to interact with dogs, keeping in mind that all dogs are capable of biting whether they've been dubbed as being good with kids or not. If you have another dog at home, try to adopt one of the opposite sex and with lower energy that the dog you already have. Above all, provide love, training, and exercise and you will be amazed at the love and loyalty you will receive in return.

0 views

Donate By Venmo @FMAR1

Applications

Wags to Riches

Resources

Legal

  • FMAR | WRDB Facebook
  • FMAR | WRDB Twitter
  • FMAR | WRDB Instagram
Fullmer Menagerie Animal Rescue is a registered non-profit 501-(c)(3) organization.
Copyright © 2020 Fullmer Menagerie Animal Rescue. All Rights Reserved.
Designed By
@nivekcook